Inpatient or Outpatient? Boy did we have a lot to learn.

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When we headed to St. Jude, we assumed (there I go again with that) that Amber would be admitted to the hospital as soon as we got there. When we were released from Rapides to go home to get ready for the trip that Sunday, Dr. Rhodes made certain that we knew to keep Amber from playing too roughly or doing anything that might cause her to fall. The worry was that if she had any major contact to the kidney, then the tumor might rupture and pour the cancer cells into her body. Between that warning and our only knowledge of hospitals being regular ones, we were expecting to go to admissions and be put in a room. We had a lot to learn.

At St. Jude, they do everything they can to keep the child out of inpatient status. We quickly discovered that we would be staying at a local hotel that would be paid by the hospital. Amber would not become inpatient until she had surgery and even then, they would only keep her the minimum amount of time necessary as inpatient status. We were given a handbook on day one that told us how the hospital operated in addition to what they paid for. It even included places in Memphis that would give discounts or provide free entrance to St. Jude patients.

Again, details of St. Jude will come in a later post. This one was just to point out that everything you know about a regular hospital goes out the window when you are talking about St. Jude. You enter a facility that you don’t consider a hospital. It becomes an extension of your home for a time. Since we were there, they now have a hotel on their grounds. In our day, they contracted with a few local motels. Our home whenever in Memphis was the Red Roof Inn. Not a five-star hotel but it was 100% paid for by St. Jude.

For more information on St. Jude, visit https://www.stjude.org.

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2 responses »

  1. I have been a Partner In Hope with St. Jude for approximately ten years and you’re right, it is an amazing place. I attended the Partners in Hope week-end appreciation event a few years ago and it was life changing. As a registered nurse, I was simply blown away by the level of care, research, and the facilities alone. The grounds are beautiful, as is the interior which is so bright and cheerful. There is such a sense of peace and hope radiating from all corners when you walk through the door. I was there on a formal tour and still felt it. I could only imagine how it must feel to a parent walking through those doors with their child in their arms.
    St. Jude truly is a place of hope and miracles, plus so much more. My family gives monthly with a cheerful heart because we know the money we send really is making a difference in a family’s life. I see so much wasteful spending in the world today and it breaks my heart. On many occasions I have thought how far that money could go in making strides to save the children of St. Jude.
    Loved your post, and look forward to reading more.

    KD Bryan

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